non-healing ulcers

09
Apr 2014
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Mini-heart Screen Capture

Thinking outside the heart

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Stem cell derived mini-heart can pump blood through sluggish veins

A U.S.-based researcher has come up with what she believes is a stem cell solution for sluggish blood flow that could knock the socks off the current standard of care.…

Stem cell derived mini-heart can pump blood through sluggish veins

A U.S.-based researcher has come up with what she believes is a stem cell solution for sluggish blood flow that could knock the socks off the current standard of care.

“Compression stockings have been used since antiquity,” says Dr. Narine Sarvazyan, a researcher at George Washington University in Washington, DC. “So we really haven’t made much progress in treating chronic venous insufficiency.”

The condition is common, affecting between 20-30% of people over the age of 50. It can be particularly distressing for people with diabetes, causing non-healing ulcers to form on their legs or ankles. It can also affect people who are paralyzed and those recovering from surgery.

Dr. Sarvazyan’s solution is to implant a “mini-heart” made of stem cell derived heart muscle cells called cardiomyocytes at the site where the blood is stagnating.  The cells form a cuff that wraps around the problem vein while rhythmically contracting and releasing to move the blood along. You can see a short video of how it works here.

The invention of the mini-heart has caused quite a stir online.  It has been picked up by the Huffington Post, Science Daily and Business Standard

So far, Dr. Sarvazyan has only created “in vitro” (Petri dish) versions of the mini-hearts in her lab. Her next step, after finalizing the design, will be to move to animal tests with rats and, ultimately, pigs. In a best-case scenario, she hopes to begin clinical trials with people after about two years.

The advantage is the mini-hearts can be tailor-made from stem cells extracted from the patient’s own fatty tissue so that there will be no danger of rejection and little risk of inflammation.

“It’s a very different application,” says Dr. Sarvazyan. “Most people who work with these cardiomyocytes have a goal of repairing cardiac muscles. That is pretty much where everyone is aiming.  But the idea came into my mind that we can use the same tissue and actually use it in different locations much more easily. You don’t have to have that much structured muscle. It doesn’t have to have much force. It’s easier to vascularize because it’s smaller.”

Dr. Sarvazyan outlines the advantages in a paper called Thinking Outside the Heart, published, in the Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

“So far I don’t see any downsides,” she told Stem Cell NewsDesk.  “Of course, nature is much smarter than us. It’s possible when we put it in animals, something may happen that we could not predict.  I can’t say for sure that it will work — we definitely need to test it.”

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07
Apr 2014
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Jeff Biernaskie Screen Captuer

Jeff Biernaskie

The bald truth

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The Daily Mail, one of the feistier UK tabloid papers, recently blasted this headline across its health pages:

Have scientists discovered a cure for BALDNESS? 

The Daily Mail, one of the feistier UK tabloid papers, recently blasted this headline across its health pages:

Have scientists discovered a cure for BALDNESS? 

Would that it were true.  According to the Huffington Post, 80 million Americans “suffer from hair loss.” For Canada, then, about 8 million people are hiding hairless heads under their hockey toques. (Full disclosure: I am one of them.)

The article is based on research conducted at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and published in Nature.  In a nutshell, Dr. Xiaowei “George” Xu, converted human skin cells into induced pluripotent stem cells to produce large quantities of epithelial stem cells, which are normally found in hair follicles. When transferred to mice, the cells created “recognizable” shafts of hair.

How recognizable is debatable.  But still, this represents an advance.

However, Dr. Xu urged caution: “We have solved one major problem, the epithelial component of the hair follicle. We need to figure out a way to also make new dermal papillae cells, and no one has figured that part out yet.”

Dr. Jeff Biernaskie (pictured at right) of the University of Calgary agrees. Any cure for baldness, he says, would have to incorporate re-invigorating dermal cell function.

“The problem is the dysfunction of these inductive dermal cells. Essentially, they either start providing wrong signals or they die off or atrophy. So the therapy that needs to be championed is actually restoring the function of dermal papillae cells. You need to revitalize those cells to restore hair growth.”

Dr. Biernaskie is not focused on finding new ways for follicles to grow on the heads of bald people. His lab is trying to decode how stem cells work to rebuild skin tissue for burn survivors, or people with chronic non-healing ulcers.

The reality, however, is that any stem cell researcher who could come up with a cure for hair loss would have the cosmetics industry pounding down their door. There would be billions of dollars to be made from such discovery — enough to set a researcher up for life, allowing him or her focus on tackling problems that can’t be solved with a wig or expensive hair transplants. “To be honest, I don’t know what could happen,” says Dr. Biernaskie, “but probably you would be financially set.”

Meanwhile, he and researchers around the world are trying to figure out the dermis puzzle.

“The reason we are working on dermis is that, while it’s a key target for restoring hair growth for conditions like androgenetic alopecia (male pattern baldness), it’s also critical for maintaining proper epidermal cell function and overall skin health. So if you can understand how to regenerate the epidermis and the dermis without forming scars and potentially generating new appendages (like follicles and glands) within that skin, that’s sort of a Holy Grail.”

Until then, the search continues. As does being bald.

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