Health Charities Forum

12
May 2014
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Putting patients first in Strategy

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Making sure that Canadian patients have safe, early access to the kind of innovative treatments that will emerge from stem cell research was the focus of the Second Health Charities Forum.…

Making sure that Canadian patients have safe, early access to the kind of innovative treatments that will emerge from stem cell research was the focus of the Second Health Charities Forum.

“There clearly is strong support for moving stem cell research forward safely and effectively,” says James Price, President & CEO of the Canadian Stem Cell Foundation, which organized the Forum in partnership with the Health Charities Coalition of Canada.  “The health charities, which represent millions of patients, realize they have an absolutely vital role to play in making sure that patients benefit from the emergence of new stem cell based treatments and cures.”

Held April 29th in Toronto, the second Forum — a first was held in November — was part of an ongoing national dialogue to craft a strategy for advancing stem cell research and development.  Discussion centred on ensuring patients can safely access innovative therapies as they make the transition from clinical trials stage to clinical practice.

The health charities leaders agreed that their organizations are ready to play an important role in patient/public engagement for the Canadian Stem Cell Strategy & Action Plan and its ultimate implementation.

Along with input from the health charities, the final draft of the Strategy,  slated to be ready this fall,  will reflect more than nine months of expert stakeholder consultations with  stem cell researchers, business and community leaders, industry and other leaders.

Second Health Charities Forum Participants

• Bill Barrable (The Rick Hansen Institute)
• Alan Bernstein (Canadian Stem Cell Foundation)
• Sîan Bevan (Canadian Cancer Society)
• Sue DeLisle (Canadian Stem Cell Foundation)
• Sam Donaldson (Ontario Stem Cell Initiative)
• Debbie Fung (KPMG)
• Janet Hux (Canadian Diabetes Association)
• Lori Lyons (The Foundation Fighting Blindness- Canada)
• Robin Markowitz (Lymphoma Canada);
• Michael May (Centre for Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine)
• Rob Oliphant (The Asthma Society)
• Biljana (Billie) Potkonjak (Canadian Liver Foundation)
• James Price (Canadian Stem Cell Foundation)
• Carolyn Pullen (Heart and Stroke Foundation)
• Johnathan Riley (The Arthritis Society)
• Janet Rossant (Ontario Stem Cell Initiative)
• Lisa Salapatek (Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of Canada)
• Marla Spiegel (Muscular Dystrophy Canada)
• Phil Welford (Stem Cell Network)

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11
Feb 2014
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Ms-Bobbe-Wood

Why health research is a solid investment

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Heart disease and stroke are two of the leading causes of death, hospitalization and prescription drug use in Canada.

While biomedical research has helped Canadians live healthier and longer lives, “it still has a long way to go,” according to Bobbe Wood, President of the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.…

Heart disease and stroke are two of the leading causes of death, hospitalization and prescription drug use in Canada.

While biomedical research has helped Canadians live healthier and longer lives, “it still has a long way to go,” according to Bobbe Wood, President of the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada. (Click here to read our NewsDesk article on a clinical trial using enhanced blood stem cells to repair heart damage.)

In the current edition of Inside Policy, Ms. Wood, a participant at the Health Charities Forum for a Canadian Stem Cell Strategy, highlights the importance and benefits of investing in cardiovascular research.

“Biomedical research cannot be turned on and off on a whim … it requires an infrastructure built over many years,” she writes. “A long-term investment in cardiovascular research is fundamental to ensure better and longer lives for Canadians, but is also one of the best economic investments we can make as a society,” adds Ms. Wood.

Investments in cardiovascular research generate a return of 21% in terms of benefits to the Canadian economy, an amount that is “enough to warm the heart of even the coldest banker or investor,” says Ms. Wood in the article.

She says that biomedical research not only makes us healthier, but it also improves our standard of living by creating jobs and generating significant payback.

With a strong education system and vibrant research and clinical communities, “Canada has all the ingredients to make biomedical research an important economic sector, while at the same time improving our health, our lives and overall economy,” says Ms. Wood.

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13
Nov 2013
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Canada’s Health Charities share insights on Stem Cell Strategy

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Leaders from 18 national health-based charities are gathering in Toronto today as part of a national dialogue to define a bold vision and strategy for advancing stem cell research toward new therapies and treatments.…

Leaders from 18 national health-based charities are gathering in Toronto today as part of a national dialogue to define a bold vision and strategy for advancing stem cell research toward new therapies and treatments.

Participants at the Health Charities Forum for a Canadian Stem Cell Strategy — whose organizations speak for millions of Canadians dealing with conditions that range from Alzheimer’s disease to spinal cord injury — will consider how to build on Canada’s tremendous strength in stem cell research to achieve better health outcomes for Canadians.

“The idea,” says James Price, President & CEO of the Canadian Stem Cell Foundation, “is to get Canada’s leading charities in one place and hear what they think should be included in a Canadian Strategy.  Because stem cells have the potential to make an impact on almost every disease, we need the health charities’ input.”

The Foundation, in partnership with the Stem Cell Network, the Centre for Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine, the Ontario Stem Cell Initiative and the Health Charities Coalition of Canada  is leading the campaign for a Canadian Stem Cell Strategy.

“We believe that stem cell science could soon lead to new therapies for a wide range of devastating diseases,” says Deirdre Freiheit, Executive Director of the HCCC, which helped put the Forum together. “That’s why our Coalition supports the dialogue to investigate creating a Canadian strategy that can bring together all the players to make these new treatments and cures a reality.”

Ideas generated at the Forum will help in crafting the White Paper that will form the basis of the Strategy.  Similar ongoing consultations with leading stem cell researchers, business and community leaders, industry and other stakeholders will also help shape the Strategy.

At the Forum, health charities leaders will discuss the outcomes they expect a Canadian Stem Cell Strategy to deliver and the guiding principles they would like to see put in place.  “This is a major first step in the consultation process with the charities,” says the Foundation’s Price. “But it won’t be the last. We are building a critically important dialogue.”

Who’s at the table?

• Alzheimer Society of Canada
• Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation
• Canadian Cancer Society
• Canadian Diabetes Association
• Canadian Liver Foundation
• Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of Canada
• Cystic Fibrosis Canada
• Health Charities Coalition of Canada
• Heart and Stroke Foundation
• JDRF Canada
• Kidney Cancer Canada
• Lymphoma Foundation Canada
• Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada
• Muscular Dystrophy Canada
• Prostate Cancer Canada
• The Foundation Fighting Blindness – Canada
• The Kidney Foundation of Canada
• The Rick Hansen Institute

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