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07
Oct 2014
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Dr. Alan Bernstein

Foundation’s leader named to Medical Hall of Fame

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Dr. Alan Bernstein, Chair of the Board of Directors for the Canadian Stem Cell Foundation, has received perhaps the highest national honour in medicine: membership in the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame.…

Dr. Alan Bernstein, Chair of the Board of Directors for the Canadian Stem Cell Foundation, has received perhaps the highest national honour in medicine: membership in the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame.

Dr. Bernstein, whose career encompasses success in both conducting outstanding research and creating the right conditions for outstanding research to be done, is one of six leading researchers and medical practitioners who will be officially inducted into the Hall of Fame April 23 in Winnipeg.

“The Canadian Medical Hall of Fame is proud to welcome these six medical heroes as honoured members,” Dr. Jean Gray, the Hall’s Chair. Gray, said in a press release. “Their contributions to health in Canada and the world are well documented and their induction to The Canadian Medical Hall of Fame is richly deserved.”

An internationally respected scientist, Dr. Bernstein made important discoveries in stem cell and cancer research, publishing more than 225 papers and advancing the understanding of the Friend virus in leukemia.  His stem cell roots run deep: he did his PhD studies at the University of Toronto with Dr. James Till who, with research partner Dr. Ernest McCulloch, had discovered stem cells in the early 1960s.

As director of the Mount Sinai’s Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute (now the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute) he built the institute into one of the leading research facilities in the world.  A Gairdner Wightman Award winner and Order of Canada member, he led the transformation of health research in Canada as the founding president of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), and oversaw a close to three-fold increase in Canada’s budget for health research.

After serving as CIHR’s leader for seven years, during which time he refocused and energized the Canadian health research community, Dr. Bernstein went on to head the Global HIV Vaccine Enterprise.  He now serves as President and CEO of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, which brings together almost  400 of Canada’s and the world’s best researchers to address questions of importance to the world.

“Alan is one of the giants of Canadian health research,” said Foundation President and CEO James Price. “With his lifetime of achievements, he truly deserves this outstanding honour. We’re delighted to congratulate him and feel extremely fortunate to have him guiding our Foundation as Board Chair.”

The other inductees include:

  • Dr. Judith G. Hall, a pediatrician and geneticist who has been at the international forefront of here field for more than four decades;
  • Dr. Bernard Langer, a global pioneer of hepatobiliary/pancreatic (HPB) surgery who developed a world-leading academic HPB and liver transplant service at Toronto General Hospital;
  • the late Dr. John McCrae, the co-author of the influential Text-Book of Pathology for Students of Medicine  and author of  In Flanders Fields;
  • Dr. Julio Montaner,  who led an international consortium of investigators to test the viability of a novel drug combination called ‘highly active antiretroviral therapy’ (HAART) to suppress HIV replication; and
  • Dr. Duncan G. Sinclair, an internationally recognized leader in health care reform.
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11
Jun 2014
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ISSCR Screen Capture

What’s the ‘real deal’ on stem cells?

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The day before 3,600 scientists, clinicians, educators and industry professionals from around the world gather in Vancouver next week for the International Society of Stem Cell Researchers’ summit, the public will get a chance to hear about the ‘real deal’ on stem cells.…

The day before 3,600 scientists, clinicians, educators and industry professionals from around the world gather in Vancouver next week for the International Society of Stem Cell Researchers’ summit, the public will get a chance to hear about the ‘real deal’ on stem cells.

Moderated by the Vancouver Sun’s Pamela Fayerman, the Tuesday, June 17th symposium focuses on why stem cells, which have been hailed for the past two decades as having the potential to fight so many diseases, have — with some notable exceptions — been slow to deliver.

The panel that includes Prof. Timothy Caulfield, author of The Cure for Everything and member of our Foundation’s Science Leadership Council, and stem cell transplant recipient Jennifer Molson will tackle the question: Why is it taking so long to make these promised therapies a reality? Industry investment expert Gregory Bonfiglio of Proteus Venture Partners and University of British Columbia stem cell researcher Dr. Kelly McNagny will also share their views.

It’s an important question. The translation of stem cell research discoveries into stem cell therapies takes a long time. It includes securing funding, getting regulatory approvals and conducting rigorous — and hugely expensive — clinical trials. In the meantime, unregulated clinics are popping up around the planet, offering “miracle” stem cell cures that have not been proven safe or effective.

The symposium, sponsored by the Stem Cell Network and the Centre for Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine, will be held in the OmniMax Theatre at Science World at TELUS World of Science. For more information, click here.

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09
Jun 2014
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Toward Treatments: how stem cells can/may soon help you

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About a year ago, we launched Toward Treatments, a user-friendly resource to help all Canadians — but especially patients, their families and friends — to understand:

• how stem cells can be used to treat devastating diseases;
• which stem cell therapies are currently accessible; and
• which ones could be available in the near future.…

About a year ago, we launched Toward Treatments, a user-friendly resource to help all Canadians — but especially patients, their families and friends — to understand:

• how stem cells can be used to treat devastating diseases;
• which stem cell therapies are currently accessible; and
• which ones could be available in the near future.

Written in reader-friendly language, each Toward Treatment disease summary starts off with the Four Questions people most want answered: Are there stem cell treatments available? If not, when might they be available? What are scientists hoping stem cells can do? Are clinical trials currently underway? That’s followed by a more detailed look at what the researchers are working on right now and what lies ahead.

We launched Toward Treatments with a dozen disease summaries, ranging from ALS to Stroke. By year’s end we had expanded to 16. As of today, there are 19 Toward Treatments, including three new entries available: Arthritis, Cerebral Palsy and Crohn’s disease.

Each Toward Treatments summary has been reviewed by a panel of scientists to make sure they are fair and balanced and up-to-date. Stem cells hold the potential to treat different types of diseases by stimulating the body to repair itself. But while significant advances have been made in recent years, many stem cell therapies have a long road ahead before being available to patients. This is about hope, not hype.

We invite you to check them out.

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07
Feb 2014
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The doctors are in

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For a Canadian stem cell strategy to succeed it must make sense to the people who work in the front lines of health care.…

For a Canadian stem cell strategy to succeed it must make sense to the people who work in the front lines of health care. That’s why many of Canada’s most respected medical practitioners gathered in Toronto yesterday to discuss the development of the Canadian Stem Cell Strategy.

The Clinician Forum, which included such notable clinician/researchers as Dr. Hans Messner (who was featured in our recent news article) from Toronto, who pioneered stem cell bone marrow transplants in the early 1970s; Dr. Ivar Mendez, the Unified Head of Surgery of the Province of Saskatchewan, and Dr. Duncan Stewart, CEO and Scientific Director of the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, was the latest event in a series of national stakeholder consultations. Previous sessions have brought together the country’s top researchers, executives from Canada’s major health charities, biotech leaders and industry experts.

“The clinic is really where the rubber hits the road in terms of health care delivery,” says James Price, President and CEO of the Canadian Stem Cell Foundation, which is championing the Campaign for a Canadian Stem Cell Strategy. “It’s crucial to hear what the clinicians have to say about how to boost clinical trials and speed up the translation of stem cell research to new therapies as quickly and safely as possible..”

Dr. Denis Claude Roy, Scientific Director of Montréal’s Centre de Recherche De L’Hôpital Maisonneuve Rosemont, and a member of the Joint Strategy Working Group, helped organize the forum to discuss the Strategy, which he sees as increasingly important in finding new treatments. “We have learned to harness the potential of stem cells and are now building on these major developments,” says Dr. Roy. “Tissue repair and even cures are now within reach for a multitude of diseases.”

The Clinician Forum, which also included officials from Health Canada who are responsible for the regulatory framework for clinical research, focused on what actions can be taken to advance clinical research and transform stem cell discoveries into improved health outcomes for patients.

The Participants:

François Auger

Director, Laboratoire d’Organogénèse Expérimental, Full Professor, Surgery Department, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, Québec, QC

Peter Ganz

Director, Biologics & Genetic Therapies Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON

Lucie Germain

Scientific Director, Laboratoire d’Organogénèse Expérimental, Professor, Department of Surgery and Associate Professor, Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, Québec, QC

Liz Anne Gillham-Eisen

Acting Director, Office of Policy and International Collaboration, Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON

Donna Hogge

Senior Scientist, Terry Fox Laboratory, Clinical Professor, Medicine, University of British Columbia, Member, Leukemia Bone Marrow Transplant Program of BC, Vancouver, BC.

Dominique Johnson

Director, Montréal Health Innovations Coordinating Center, a Division of the Montréal Heart Institute, Montréal, QC

Armand Keating

Director, Cell Therapy Program and Philip S. Orsino Facility for Cell Therapy, Princess Margaret Hospital/Ontario Cancer Institute, Senior Scientist, Division of Experimental Therapeutics, Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network, Director, Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine; Epstein Chair in Cell Therapy and Transplantation, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON

Michael May

Chief Executive Officer, Centre for Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine, Toronto, ON

Jeffrey Medin

Senior Scientist, Ontario Cancer Institute, Senior Scientist, Toronto Western Research Institute, Toronto, ON

Ivar Mendez

Fred H. Wigmore Professor of Surgery, University of Saskatchewan and Unified Head of Surgery for the Province of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK

Hans Messner

Professor of Medicine, University of Toronto, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON

Nicolas Noiseux

Cardiac surgeon, Associate Professor of Surgery, Director of Research Cardiovascular Surgery, Hôtel-Dieu du Centre hospitalier de l’université de Montréal, Montréal, QC

James Price

President & Chief Executive Officer, Canadian Stem Cell Foundation, Ottawa, ON

Michael Rosu-Myles

Associate Director, Centre for Biologics Evaluationm, Senior Research Scientist, Stem Cell Research Laboratory, Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON

Denis Claude Roy

Director, Cellular Therapy Laboratory, Scientific Director, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont. Professor at the University of Montréal, Montréal, QC

Michael Rudnicki

Senior Scientist and Director of the Regenerative Medicine Program and the Sprott Centre for Stem Cell Research, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Professor, Department of Medicine and Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Scientific Director, Stem Cell Network, Ottawa, ON

Khalid Sabihuddin

Program Lead, HUB Health Research Solutions, St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, ON

Duncan Stewart

CEO & Scientific Director and Senior Scientist in the Regenerative Medicine Program and Evelyne and Rowell Laishley Chair, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Vice-President, Research, The Ottawa Hospital, Professor, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON

Sowmya Viswanathan

Associate Director Cell Therapy Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON

Donna Wall

Professor, Pediatrics and Child Health, Immunology, and Internal Medicine, Pediatric Hematology, Oncology, Transplantation, Director, Manitoba Blood and Marrow Transplant Program, CancerCare Manitoba, University of Manitoba. Winnipeg, MB

Philip Welford

Executive Director, Stem Cell Network, Ottawa, ON

Lori West

Professor of Pediatrics, Surgery and Immunology, Director, Canadian National Transplant Research Program, Director (Acting) and Research Director, Alberta Transplant Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB

David Young

Chair, Ontario Bioscience Innovation Organization, Chief Executive Officer, Actium Research Inc., Toronto, ON

Peter Zandstra

Scientific Director, Centre for Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine, Professor, Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON

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05
Feb 2014
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Rob and Teneille McConnell on their wedding day in June

Stem cells free Saskatchewan man from Crohn’s

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Rob McConnell’s Crohn’s disease struck about 13 years ago, when he was 20. The Elrose, Saskatchewan farm manager believes the stress of his father’s death had a lot to do with the onset of the debilitating disease — and how hard it hit him.…

Rob McConnell’s Crohn’s disease struck about 13 years ago, when he was 20. The Elrose, Saskatchewan farm manager believes the stress of his father’s death had a lot to do with the onset of the debilitating disease — and how hard it hit him.

The six-footer’s weight dropped to 95 pounds, the result of his decreased appetite, abdominal pain and chronic diarrhea that sent him to the toilet at least a dozen times a day.  He underwent more operations than he can remember to remove diseased pieces of his intestines, and when he wasn’t in hospital he “was on enough steroids and pain killers to kill a small horse.”

Crohn’s disease and a related condition called ulcerative colitis occur when the body’s immune system reacts to genetic and/or environmental triggers by attacking the digestive tract. The two conditions are commonly referred to as Inflammatory Bowel Disease or IBD. Canada has one of the highest incidences of IBD in the world, with one in about 150 — about 230,000 Canadians — affected.  (For a lively and informative overview of IBD, check out this video at the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of Canada site.)

Rob tried every drug and treatment available to combat his Crohn’s.  They would work for a while. Some, especially the steroids, came with severe side-effects (moon-shaped face, hair loss, sore joints and brittle bones).  But the Crohn’s kept coming back.

“I was going downhill quickly,” says Rob. “I was at the hospital all the time and my girlfriend Teneille would go home and go online looking for other options, especially information about stem cell transplants. She found a blog by Billy Tytaneck.”

In 2008, Billy Tytaneck was able to avoid radical surgery to remove much of his bowel when Dr. Harry Atkins of the Ottawa General Hospital performed a stem cell bone marrow transplant to rebuild his immune system. Dr. Atkins has been featured in this space for his success in treating patients with Multiple Sclerosis, as well as Stiff Person Syndrome and neuromyelitis optica.

Teneille wrote to Dr. Atkins, who asked her to send along Rob’s medical records. “About a week later he responded and told me: ‘You know what? I think you might be a candidate.’  It was late February 2012 when I went to Ottawa for my consultation and right away I had a great connection with Dr. Atkins, who sat me down and went through the whole procedure.”

Three months later, Rob was back in Ottawa for his “Autologous Peripheral Stem Cell Transplant” using stem cells that were extracted from his blood, then purified and fortified. After undergoing extreme chemotherapy to annihilate his diseased immune system, Rob was given back the robust stem cells to rebuild a new immune system.

He sailed through the treatment that others have found excruciating. “I took the chemo relatively well. There was some nausea and I had other things that bothered me, but I didn’t get the whole super illness.”

After staying in Ottawa for follow-up treatments and infection monitoring, Rob went back to Saskatchewan in the fall where, a year-and-a-half later, the Crohn’s is in remission and he feels fine. No more frequent trips to the bathroom. No more cramps. No more weight loss: he’s up to 161 pounds now, his heaviest ever. He no longer takes any medication.

While it is still too early to say whether Rob’s Crohn’s is cured — the condition is known to wax and wane — so far so good.  “I eat very well,” says Rob. “Things that used to bother me don’t bother me anymore. There have been no attacks. I used to have a pain twice an hour or more. It has been a long while since I had one.”

And his quality of life has vastly improved.  “It is just amazing. I started another business. Teneille and I got married at the end of June. I’m doing so much more and feeling so much better.  I really don’t think I would be on this side of the grass if I didn’t get that treatment.”

(Editor’s Note: CNN reports on Dr. Atkins and his work with Stiff Person Syndrome patients.)

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24
Jan 2014
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‘An amazing time’

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“It is an amazing time to be a stem cell scientist,” says Dr. Janet Rossant, Chief of Research and Senior Scientist at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto and one of the members of the Foundation’s Science Leadership Council.…

“It is an amazing time to be a stem cell scientist,” says Dr. Janet Rossant, Chief of Research and Senior Scientist at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto and one of the members of the Foundation’s Science Leadership Council.

Dr. Rossant is an internationally recognized expert in developmental biology and the President of International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR). In her recent video, she addressed the international stem cell community to underline the importance of global partnerships.

With many questions to be answered in the future, stem cell scientists worldwide “are on the course of taking stem cells and turning them into new therapies to treat some of the major chronic diseases, such as Parkinson’s or diabetes,” she says.

In order to achieve this, stem cell scientists, bio engineers, clinicians and regulators should all work together. “Come join us and make a difference,” says Dr. Rossant.

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23
Jan 2014
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Tina Ceroni on Canada AM: ‘I have a whole new lease on life’

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As we reported yesterday, Tina Ceroni, with the help of Dr. Harry Atkins, shared her story with Beverly Thomson today on Canada AM.…

As we reported yesterday, Tina Ceroni, with the help of Dr. Harry Atkins, shared her story with Beverly Thomson today on Canada AM.

Tina is an accomplished athlete and fitness trainer who was diagnosed with Stiff Person Syndrome (SPS), a rare autoimmune disease that affects one in a million people.

In her mid-20’s Tina started experiencing mild spasms and rigidity in her legs. She always assumed they were due to her training regime. She was eventually diagnosed SPS. The contractions and spasms became so severe that she required frequent trips to the emergency ward to save her life.

In April 2011, Tina received a stem cell transplant at Ottawa General Hospital.

The procedure performed by Dr. Atkins is very intense. Strong doses of chemotherapy “kill” the immune system in order to create a new disease-free immune system seeded by stem cells.

“There are risks of severe organ failure or even death,” Dr. Atkins explained on the program.

“It is a challenging process and it takes time to recover from something like that,” added Tina.

Today Tina is completely symptom free. “There are no words to describe how amazing I feel now. I have a whole new lease on life and no limitations on what I can do.”

Click here to watch the interview.

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07
Jan 2014
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Dr Michael Rudnicki

‘They desire a better country’

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The end of the year brought new recognition to Dr. Michael Rudnicki, one of Canada’s leading stem cell scientists and a member of the Canadian Stem Cell Foundation’s Board of Directors.…

The end of the year brought new recognition to Dr. Michael Rudnicki, one of Canada’s leading stem cell scientists and a member of the Canadian Stem Cell Foundation’s Board of Directors. Dr. Rudnicki has been appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada for contributing to scientific breakthroughs in the area of muscle development.

“Stem cell research is really an area of strategic strength in Canada,” Dr. Rudnicki, CEO and Scientific Director of the Stem Cell Network, told the Ottawa Citizen in its report of the latest appointments.

From the discovery of stem cells in 1961 by Drs. Jim Till and Ernest McCulloch until today, Canada has played a leading role in stem cell research. Clearly, Canadian researchers “desire a better country” or desiderantes meliorem patriam, as the motto of the Order of Canada says.

The Order of Canada recognizes outstanding lifelong contributions made by Canadians in different fields. The honour of the Officer is the second highest recognition, awarded for a lifetime of achievement and merit of a high degree, especially in service to Canada or to humanity at large. Dr. Rudnicki’s appointment means the Foundation’s Board of Directors now includes six Order of Canada honorees, including L. Jacques Ménard, who holds the highest rank awarded, Companion.

Other honorees include rock stars Jim Cuddy and Greg Keelor of Blue Rodeo and actress/filmmaker Sarah Polley.

Dr. Rudnicki is a Senior Scientist and the Director of the Regenerative Medicine Program and the Sprott Centre for Stem Cell Research at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. He is also a Professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of Ottawa and holds the Canada Research Chair in Molecular Genetics.

His research focuses on the molecular mechanisms that regulate the determination, proliferation, and differentiation of stem cells tissue regeneration. His lab identified proteins that play a fundamental role in muscle stem cell function and that could be used to treat muscle diseases. Muscle diseases, such as Muscular Dystrophy in its different forms, are caused by genetic deficiency. There is hope that stem cells can help repair or replace damaged genes.

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17
Dec 2013
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Industry leaders help plot course

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What will it take to transform Canadian scientists’ innovative research experiments into stem cell therapies?

A group of industry representatives, from small biotech firms to large multinational health care corporations, met in Toronto on Dec.…

What will it take to transform Canadian scientists’ innovative research experiments into stem cell therapies?

A group of industry representatives, from small biotech firms to large multinational health care corporations, met in Toronto on Dec. 13th to share their insights into how the Canadian Stem Cell Strategy should address this key challenge.

“The information gathered at this first Industry Forum will be crucial in helping to shape the Strategy and finding ways to overcome obstacles that can block excellent research from becoming new treatments and cures,” said James Price, President & CEO of the Canadian Stem Cell Foundation.

The Foundation, in partnership with the Stem Cell Network, the Centre for Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine, the Ontario Stem Cell Initiative and the Health Charities Coalition of Canada is leading the campaign for a Canadian Stem Cell Strategy.

The Industry Forum is one of several consultation sessions underway as part of the process of developing the Strategy. Previous gatherings have included Canada’s major health charities and leading experts in finance and investment. As well, the country’s top scientists are engaged in ongoing discussions to address how to best marshal Canada’s outstanding talent in stem cell research to come up with cures and treatments for currently incurable and untreatable diseases.

Friday’s Forum was followed by a meeting of key members of an International Working Group. The International Group met to give early insight into what other countries are doing and where Canada can have the greatest impact globally.

Industry Forum Participants

Actium Research Inc. 

David Young, Chief Executive Officer

Canadian Stem Cell Foundation

Alan Bernstein,* Chair, Board of Directors

James Price, President & Chief Executive Officer

Centre for Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine

Michael Israels, Chief Operating Officer

Michael May,* Chief Executive Officer

Rahul Sarugaser, Director Business Development

GE Healthcare Life Sciences

Fiona Fitzgerald, National Sales and Marketing Manager

Stephen Minger,* Global Head of Research and Development for Cell Technologies

Insception Biosciences Inc.

Richard Lockie, Chief Executive Officer

Tim Smith, Chief Executive Officer

Proteus Venture Partners

Gregory Bonfiglio,* Founder & Managing Partner

Stem Cell Network

Philip Welford,* Executive Director

Stem Cell Therapeutics

James Parsons, Chief Financial Officer

Tissue Regeneration Therapeutics Inc.

Simon Bubnic, Senior Scientist

University College London

Chris Mason,* Chair, Regenerative Medicine Bioprocessing

* Members of the International Working Group for the Canadian Stem Cell Strategy

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11
Dec 2013
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Finance & Investment experts talk Strategy

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It’s not about the money. It’s about finding cures for currently incurable diseases.

But if money does make the world go round, then it will play an important role in ensuring that the Canadian Stem Cell Strategy succeeds.…

It’s not about the money. It’s about finding cures for currently incurable diseases.

But if money does make the world go round, then it will play an important role in ensuring that the Canadian Stem Cell Strategy succeeds.

That’s why a dozen of Canada’s leading thinkers in finance and investment are gathering in Toronto today. Joining the national dialogue, they will share their suggestions on how to best develop and implement — and finance — a strategy to drive stem cell research toward new therapies and treatments.

Participants at the Finance & Investment Forum for a Canadian Stem Cell Strategy include executives from companies that manage billions of dollars of capital investment in enterprises ranging from commercial and industrial real-estate to cutting-edge life sciences technologies.

These men and women will provide their input into how to capitalize on Canada’s outstanding assets in stem cell research to achieve better health outcomes for Canadians, make health care sustainable and build a Canadian industry around regenerative medicine.

“We are fortunate,” says James Price, President & CEO of the Canadian Stem Cell Foundation. “We have an amazing array of finance and investment authorities prepared to help us build the Canadian Strategy. This is just the start, but their guidance definitely will help us to align Canada’s resources to deliver new cures and treatments to Canadians.”

The Foundation, in partnership with the Stem Cell Network, the Centre for Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine, the Ontario Stem Cell Initiative and the Health Charities Coalition of Canada is leading the campaign for a Canadian Stem Cell Strategy.  Ideas generated at today’s Forum will help in crafting the Strategy.  Similar ongoing consultations with leading stem cell researchers, national health charity leaders, industry and other stakeholders will also help shape the Strategy.

Participants:

  • James Price, President  & Chief Executive Officer, Canadian Stem Cell Foundation 
  • Christine Williams, Vice-President, Research, Canadian Cancer Society
  • Michael May, Chief Executive Officer, Centre for Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine
  • Donna Parr, President, Crimson Capital
  • Richard Meadows, Managing Partner, CTI Life Sciences Fund
  • Denis Ho, Founder, ImpactLink Capital
  • Randy Benson, Partner, KPMG 
  • Brian Underdown, Managing Director, Lumira Capital
  • Dan Kanashiro, Vice-President Investments, Orlando Corporation
  • Gregory Bonfiglio, Founder & Managing Partner, Proteus Venture Partners
  • Philip Welford, Executive Director, Stem Cell Network
  • Cédric Bisson, Venture Partner, Teralys Capital 
  • Cynthia Lavoie, General Partner, TVM Capital
  • Stefan Larson, Entrepreneur-in-Residence, Versant Ventures
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