Dr. Mick Bhatia

18
Oct 2017
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Diabetes Drug May Help to Fight Leukemia

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A study led by Dr. Mick Bhatia at McMaster University shows that a readily available drug that induces fat cell production in bone marrow also suppresses leukemia while promoting the production of healthy blood cells.…

A study led by Dr. Mick Bhatia at McMaster University shows that a readily available drug that induces fat cell production in bone marrow also suppresses leukemia while promoting the production of healthy blood cells.

“The focus of chemotherapy and existing standard-of-care is on killing cancer cells but instead we took a completely different approach which changes the environment the cancer cells live in,” Dr. Bhatia, Director and Senior Scientist with McMaster’s Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute, explained in a press.  The study published in the journal Nature Cell Biology.

Increasing fat cells in the bone marrow creates an environment that favors the growth of healthy blood cells and blocks out leukemic cells.  The team targeted a single cell type in one tissue and had positive results when tested in mice.

Dr. Bhatia believes that there is immediate translational potential with minimal side effects as the drug can be given in a much lower dose and with a shorter duration than in its intended use for diabetes treatment.  In an interview with CBC, Dr. Bhatia said that the team is looking to move to clinical trials on humans within two to three years.

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14
Nov 2016
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McMaster’s research centre marks decade with new site/logo

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After a decade of innovation, McMaster’s Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute (SCC-RI) has launched a new website to draw attention to research advances and share links to resources for patients, care givers and future scientists. …

After a decade of innovation, McMaster’s Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute (SCC-RI) has launched a new website to draw attention to research advances and share links to resources for patients, care givers and future scientists.  The SCC-RI’s new logo, a stylized hand, represents the numerous people involved in translating research into new therapeutic options for patients.

The SCC-RI was established in 2006 — the same year Dr. Shinya Yamanaka established his game-changing protocol to turn adult skin stem cells back to an embryonic stem cell-like state of pluripotency — to drive new therapies to the clinic. Since the beginning, SCC-RI has focused its research on improving bone marrow and cord blood transplants, finding cell-based solutions to cancer and identifying and targeting the cells responsible for neural disorders such as autism.

“Our commitment to working with human cells and our established drug discovery capabilities make this the best place for moving forward to patient-specific drug discovery,” said Dr. Karun Singh, Principal Investigator at SCC-RI in a recent blog post.

Dr. Singh recently led a team that discovered a gene mutation that causes autism spectrum disorders (ASD).  Having identified the genetic glitch, researchers can now focus their efforts on finding a way to improve the brain connections that are causing symptoms of ASD.

The SCC-RI team has developed a robotic system to test a library of currently available drugs on a variety of diseased cells before starting human trials. In a landmark study, Dr. Mick Bhatia, SCC-RI Director and Senior Scientist, found the antipsychotic drug, thioridazine, kills cancer stem cells responsible for initiating leukemia without harming normal stem cells. A  Phase I clinical trial is now underway.

 

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28
May 2015
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Hitting a nerve: researchers turn blood into neural cells

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Stem cell researchers from McMaster University have found a way to turn human blood cells into neural cells, opening the door to new approaches to understanding and treating pain.…

Stem cell researchers from McMaster University have found a way to turn human blood cells into neural cells, opening the door to new approaches to understanding and treating pain.

The patented technique, described in a paper published in Cell Reports, involves extracting stem cells from blood and converting them into neural cells — like those found in the brain and the nervous system — over about a month.

“No one has ever done this with adult blood, to make this repertoire of neural cells, “Dr. Mick Bhatia, Director of McMaster University’s Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute, told CTV News.

Dr. Bhatia and his team started working on the project after successfully converting skin cells into blood a few years ago. The researchers thought it would be useful to be able to make other kinds of cells from blood because it is easily accessible, regenerates on its own, and the resulting cells can be personalized.

“And so with this technology, blood could become a building block for neural cells,” Dr. Bhatia explained in CTV’s report.

The findings could lead to treatment advances for those suffering with chronic pain or nerve diseases. The researchers are  hopeful that one day it will be possible to take a blood sample from a patient and quickly produce a million nerve cells. They could then study those cells to better understand why certain people feel pain or why others experience numbness.

New pain medications that would specifically target neural cells, rather than just block the perception of pain, might also be developed thanks to the novel technique.”Pain is really poorly understood right now, and the drugs available are not well characterized,” Dr. Bhatia said in the CTV news report. “Most are narcotics and opioids that are addictive and they’re not very specific to the cells you’re trying to target.”

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01
Feb 2015
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Dr. Mick Bhatia

Dr. Mick Bhatia puts Howe case into perspective on Day 6

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Dr. Mick Bhatia, Director of McMaster University’s Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute, was the featured guest on CBC Radio’s Day 6 program on Saturday morning as it delved into the controversial subject of stem cell tourism.…

Dr. Mick Bhatia, Director of McMaster University’s Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute, was the featured guest on CBC Radio’s Day 6 program on Saturday morning as it delved into the controversial subject of stem cell tourism.

Host Brent Bambury interviewed Dr. Bhatia, a member of our Foundation’s Science Leadership Council, to get his expert perspective on stroke survivor Gordie Howe’s so-called “miraculous” recovery after he travelled to Tijuana for an experimental treatment.

Along with the high costs people often pay for unproven therapies that often do not produce results, Dr. Bhatia warned of the physical dangers of untested treatments. He pointed out that unlike a drug that can be discontinued in the event of an adverse effect, “if a cell goes rogue in the body” there is no way of controlling it. “Cells can go anywhere and can grow uncontrollably,” producing tumours.

Foundation CEO & President James Price says Howe’s case underscores the need to implement the Canadian Stem Cell Strategy & Action Plan. “Canada has a world-class stem cell sector and we are poised to bring new treatments to the clinic. It’s about bringing more clinical trials to Canada so that Canadians have early access to therapies that are proven to be safe and effective.”

 

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30
Jan 2015
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Doubts about Howe’s treatment underscore need for Strategy

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The experimental stem cell treatment Gordie Howe underwent in Tijuana in December has raised further scientific concerns.

According to a report by Canadian Press health writer Sheryl Ubelacker that was carried online by the Globe and Mail, regenerative medicine experts question whether stem cells are actually responsible for what Howe’s son has called a “miraculous” recovery.…

The experimental stem cell treatment Gordie Howe underwent in Tijuana in December has raised further scientific concerns.

According to a report by Canadian Press health writer Sheryl Ubelacker that was carried online by the Globe and Mail, regenerative medicine experts question whether stem cells are actually responsible for what Howe’s son has called a “miraculous” recovery.

According to Dr. Mick Bhatia, Director of the Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute at McMaster University, Howe’s apparent recovery has many unknown factors. “Is this a transient effect, or is it really a perceived or somewhat of a placebo effect and is there something really happening? Scientifically and biologically that is important,” he told CP.

In addition, Dr. Bhatia is concerned that immunosuppression drugs or any other drugs Howe might have taken before the treatment could be showing some of the improvement effects. “We really don’t know.”

Dr. Michael Rudnicki, CEO and Scientific Director of the Stem Cell Network and a member of the Foundation’s Board of Directors, told CP  that while he couldn’t speak specifically about Howe’s treatment in Mexico as it’s not clear how much the hockey legend has improved or whether the stem cell treatment he received was responsible, some patients have suffered adverse effects from therapies received at clinics abroad. “There’s real potential for doing harm,” said Dr. Rudnicki. “And a person claiming to get better doesn’t prove anything,” he added.

Although there is currently no stem cell treatment for stroke approved by Health Canada, the Canadian Stem Cell Strategy & Action Plan will lead the way to delivering five to 10 novel treatments for chronic diseases within 10 years.

If Canada makes stem cell research and development a national priority, the Strategy will ultimately ensure the access to stem cell treatments that are proven to be safe and effective.

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